Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Home RSS
 
 
 

Some things do not need to change

March 2, 2013
The Leader Herald

The word "change" gets bandied about as if it is a concept, but it is descriptive of nothing except to replace something else. The good Fulton-Montgomery Community College president stated that it is embracing change for success, such as modernizing various student recreation facilities at the college and modifying other programs within the college curriculum. The latter one would assume is a requirement; as for student recreation, one would think that expense/energy would best be directed toward making students more proficient in mathematic and science achievements, given the FM president's awareness (and rightly so) of the importance of our nation's progress in these technological fields.

One should note that our harnessing of the electron and technological progress in the fields of medicine, electronics and engineering are just the beginning of a better world for all. This advancing technology in no way changes our need for disciplined, well-motivated, well-schooled, ambitious students who in the past made America what it is today. There can be no change in these student requisites if we are to succeed as the leader of the free world. America in the past has always run on merit; it must continue to do so.

Our present education system, one must confess, is a shambles when compared to years ago. Our educators have lowered the achievement bar to improve the pass/fail requirements to justify a failing education system. This lowering of performance-standard requirements for social or political reasons cheapens the students' academic credentials and diminishes their potential to our society.

Our clarion call to this educational failure is to change back to that education system that gave us the "greatest generation."

Too much expense/energy is being used to reinvent education. One need only to compare what it costs the taxpayers in other similar states, with better academic standards. Our costs are in most cases more than double theirs. Why is this?

Our local educators want to group our young students by age in separate buildings. Now little Jane and Johnny will be carted all over town. Why? Who knows? Another one of those "changes." The only ones who should be authorizing those added transportation risks are the parents of those children, no one else.

JOE PARKER

Mayfield

 
 

 

I am looking for:
in:
News, Blogs & Events Web