Grow Amsterdam NY going online

AMSTERDAM — Grow Amsterdam NY was set to launch its spring programming — and had a full calendar of environmental workshops lined up through June — when the coronavirus pandemic hit New York. Compost Works food scrap orientations, home composting workshops, a “Green up Your Cleanup” workshop on alternatives to household toxic cleaning chemicals, and re-usable T-shirt bag workshops were all put on hold. Going forward, Grow Amsterdam NYs programming will shift to online. Webinars, Zoom meetings, and Facetime video chats have replaced in person workshops and hands-on learning. The first online offering will be the Compost Works Orientation webinar…
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A new approach to wildfires in time of COVID-19

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — They are two disasters that require opposite responses: To save lives and reduce the spread of COVID-19, people are being told to remain isolated. But in a wildfire, thousands of firefighters must work in close quarters for weeks at a time. Wildfires have already broken out in Texas and Florida, and agencies are scrambling to finish plans for a new approach. They are considering waivers for some training requirements to previously-certified crew members, and moving some training online. Other proposals include limiting fire engines to a driver and one passenger, requiring other crew members to ride…
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Antibody survey shows wide exposure to virus in N.Y.

NEW YORK — More evidence is emerging that far more New Yorkers have had the coronavirus than the number confirmed by lab tests, officials said Thursday, offering insight that could help authorities decide how and how quickly to let people stop isolating from friends and return to work. Blood samples collected from about 3,000 people indicated that nearly 14 percent had developed antibodies to fight a coronavirus infection, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said at his daily news briefing. In New York City, the epicenter of the pandemic in the U.S., 21 percent of the people tested had antibodies. It’s not know…
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Sparkling waters hide some lasting harm from the 2010 oil spill

NEW ORLEANS — Ten years after a well blew wild under a BP platform in the Gulf of Mexico, killing 11 men and touching off the nation’s worst offshore oil spill, gulf waters sparkle in the sunlight, its fish are safe to eat, and thick, black oil no longer visibly stains the beaches and estuaries. Brown pelicans, a symbol of the spill’s ecological damage because so many dived after fish and came up coated with oil, are doing well. But scientists who spent the decade studying the Deepwater Horizon spill still worry about its effects on dolphins, whales, sea turtles,…
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The new faces of Type 1 diabetes

PHILADELPHIA — Kimberley Jarrett tucked her 15-month-old son into his car seat and jumped in beside him as her husband took off for the hospital, driving as fast as he dared. During the brief trip from their Mount Airy home, Kim dabbed coconut water onto Jace’s tongue. To her shock, it felt like sandpaper, scratchy and bone dry. Julian pulled up to Abington Hospital-Jefferson Health, and Kim rushed into the emergency department with her baby in her arms and her heart in her throat. Earlier in the week, a pediatrician said Jace’s lethargy, constant demands for a drink, and excessive…
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Beloved wandering Ore. wolf is believed to be dead

SALEM, Ore. — A wolf that wandered thousands of miles from Oregon and became the first wild wolf spotted in California in almost 90 years before returning to Oregon and starting a pack is believed to be dead, wildlife officials said. The wandering wolf, known as OR7, leaves behind a pack composed of its mate and three other wolves in the mountains of southern Oregon, wildlife biologists said in an annual wolf report released Wednesday. It’s one of 22 packs documented in Oregon, up from 16 in 2018. The number of wolves in the state increased 15 percent to 158…
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