Music set for Stanton statue unveiling

PHOTOGRAPHER:
Pictured is a rendering of the bronze statue of suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton that has been commissioned by the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Women’s Consortium. Stanton was born and raised in Johnstown. The statue will be erected in the Sir William Johnson Park on West Main Street in 2020 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution that gave all women the right to vote. An anonymous donor has offered to give up to $10,000 in matching funds to help pay for the statue, which will cost $75,000. To date, more than $50,000 has been raised. (Photo submitted)

JOHNSTOWN — Clare Wettemann will perform her original ballad “Elizabeth Cady Stanton” on Thursday, in the Charles Jenner Band Shell in the Sir William Johnson Park on W. Main Street.

The performance will be part of the unveiling ceremony for the statue of Elizabeth Cady Stanton on Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m.

Also providing musical entertainment at the event will be the Rev. G.W. “Blake” Blakesley from the First Presbyterian Church in Johnstown. He will perform additional suffrage songs on the banjo accompanied by Brett Dening on the penny whistle and Dening’s teenage daughter Shannon on the fiddle. Blakesley will also lead a sing-a-long of additional suffrage songs. Members of the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Women’s Consortium dressed in suffrage attire will welcome those in attendance and pass out lyrics for the sing-a-long, the release said.

The public is invited to attend and bring a lawn chair. Those who have not received their COVID vaccinations are required to wear a mask. In case of rain, attendees should bring an umbrella, the release said.

At 7 p.m., following the unveiling ceremonies, Sue Macy, author of the book, “Wheels of Change,” will do a presentation on the importance of bicycling to the suffrage movement.

Macy’s program will be held in the sanctuary of St. John’s Episcopal Church, 1 N. Market St. (in the park). The presentation is free and open to the public.

By Paul Wager