Apothecary in downtown Gloversville is thriving

By Charles Erickson

For The Leader-Herald

GLOVERSVILLE – The co-owner of The Apothecary by Essentially Simple said it would be difficult to neatly define her target customer with the same demographic measures as used by some sellers of beers, automobiles and assorted consumer goods. Tanyalynnette Grimes said age, gender and income seemed to have little impact on the types of patrons at the store, at 34 N. Main St., which sells oils, teas and other natural products.

“We see men and women in here,” Grimes said. “All types. They’re definitely people who are making conscious choices about what they’re putting in and on and around their body.”

Nearly six months after the store opened, the co-owner said she is pleased with revenues.

“Business is great,” Grimes said recently.

Grimes and her partner, Bradly Teetz, own the store through their company, Micropolis Development Group, LLC.

Micropolis has multiple commercial ventures in Gloversville. It also owns AGORA Marketplace, at 50 N. Main, where more than 100 vendors sell art, photography, baked goods, local foods and other wares of their own creation.

AGORA Marketplace also opened the same day as The Apothecary.

The following month, Micropolis Development Group, LLC, closed on its purchase of the Kingsboro Golf Club. The Pines, a restaurant and event center, is co-located on the nine-hole course. Grimes said the company has interests in a few other properties in the city.

“We’re a community developer,” she said. “We create businesses for people to shop at, which creates jobs for people to work. And then our future plan is to create places that people can live.”

The natural-products store is considered an extension of Essentially Simple, which was formed in 2018 as a holistic essential oils manufacturer owned by Teetz and Grimes. The oils were produced in a clean room facility located off Route 29A, but most of the oils for sale inside the Gloversville store were made by other vendors.

“We stopped manufacturing our own products when we opened,” Grimes said. “We are looking at going back into manufacturing, but I would rather partner with another business and support another small business than manufacture the product myself.”

Grimes spoke from the other side of the sales counter, toward the rear of the store. A glass case serves as the counter, and inside the case were dozens of natural ingredients displayed in containers shaped like goldfish bowls.

“These are your base ingredients,” Grimes said. “You can use them in the kitchen. You can use them in making products.”

One of the containers was labeled as having ginger root powder. Another was marked as holding grapefruit peel California.

“Ginger is great for your digestive system,” Grimes said. “Grapefruit peel is fantastic for the lymph system.”

An empty area behind the sales counter is being expanded so the store can carry more of these types of ingredients, Grimes said.

“I’ve noticed that we get two kinds of people in here,” said Wendy Matern, an employee at The Apothecary by Essentially Simple since May. “People who’re already into it and really know about it. And people who’re looking to get more information. We get a lot of curious people.”

Grimes said some of the store’s top sellers were the hand and dish soaps and laundry cleaners made by Sapadilla. The products are derived from plant-based ingredients such as rosemary and peppermint.

The soaps, like many of the products in the store, are available for sale in bulk quantities. When customers bring their own containers, according to Grimes, they are only paying about 12 cents per ounce for the soaps because they are sold in concentrated form.

Matern said a patron, earlier on this Saturday, had brought in four containers to fill with grapeseed oil. The woman asked Matern if she had made a tabulation mistake when she was told she owed $5.60 for the oil.

“She couldn’t believe that’s all it cost,” Matern said.

The Apothecary by Essentially Simple is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Grimes said she is looking to add another employee to the store’s payroll.

Roxi Cook, a Gloversville resident for more than half a century, said she had purchased bulk teas, herbs, oils and laundry detergents from the store. Standing near a very large container of pink Himalayan salt, shelved next to another container holding whole sage leaf, she said she was astonished that such a place of commerce had opened in the city.

“I’ve lived here long enough to know what Gloversville used to be and what I would love to see it be again,” Cook said. “So, this to me is very exciting.”

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