Op-Ed Columns

Political dissent and freedom

By JUDGE ANDREW NAPOLIANO Two weeks ago, this column offered a brief history of the freedom of speech in America. The essence of the column was that all public speech is lawful when there is time for more speech to challenge it and that the remedy for hate speech is not censorship, but more speech. Last week, this column addressed the unconstitutional behavior of federal agents in Portland, Oregon, most of whom are out among peaceful demonstrators…
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Crowded bars face crackdowns

Newsday, July 28 Must be nice to forget about the pandemic. That’s the only explanation for what happened among the crowd of people who appeared close to a stage and not social-distanced in a video of a Saturday Water Mill charity concert, which included performances from electronic music duo The Chainsmokers, Southampton Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman, and “DJ D-Sol.” That last is Goldman Sachs chief executive David Solomon, according to the concert organizer’s “Event Overview”…
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Losing the global dating game

By Rachel Marsden The U.S. won over the hearts and minds of other nations in the Cold War era because they looked America up and down and decided they wanted a piece of what was on offer — namely, its wallet, er, “values.” But now, as the U.S. resorts to threatening allies to maintain the status quo in its relationships, it should ask why it lost its mojo to the benefit of a new cash-flashing…
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Land of plenty sinks into anxiety

By FROMA HARROP A friend and I shared the same consumer frustration — and guilt over having it. We each wanted a bike rack for our cars but could not obtain our first choices. “I wanted to order a 1UP bike rack,” my pal, who used to manufacture sports equipment, said. “Sold out and won’t take orders until August 29th.” Apparently, there’s a shortage of bikes as well, and, to get granular, a dearth of…
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End the Marxism love affair

By LAURA HOLLIS I watched director Agnieszka Holland’s award-winning film “Mr. Jones” this week. It’s truly outstanding, a quiet masterpiece about the young Welsh journalist Gareth Jones who risked his life to expose what is now called the Holomodor, the 1932-33 famine in Ukraine caused by the collectivist policies of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin. Aware of troubling rumors, Jones used his political connections as foreign policy advisor to English Prime Minister Lloyd George to get…
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Don’t hand out vaccines based on race

By BETSY MCCAUGHEY A federal committee is considering pushing Blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans to the front of the line for COVID-19 vaccines, ahead of whites. A COVID-19 vaccine could be ready by year’s end but not in sufficient quantity to vaccinate over 300 million Americans. Frontline health care workers and national security personnel will be top priority, but after that, who comes next? Dr. Jose Romero, who chairs the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices,…
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