Op-Ed Columns

The double-edged sword

By DIANE DIMOND On the television crime drama “FBI,” Special Agent Jubal Valentine brusquely orders an underling to run a photograph through facial recognition to identify a suspect. Boom! After a rocket-speed search, the computer spits out a name and address. Field agents get to work, and in no time, the bad guy is under arrest. I’m here to tell you it is not that easy and it’s not that accurate. Facial recognition programs are…
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Stay away from S.C.

By KATHLEEN PARKER At times like this, I’m tempted to dig out my father’s doormat, which bore the words: “Go away.” A dedicated misanthrope, he at least maintained a sense of humor. Today, as South Carolina’s COVID-19 infection rate skyrockets, there’s not much to chuckle about. As of Friday, more than 75 percent of hospital beds were filled and one coastal hospital was seeking staffing help from the National Guard. How did we get so…
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Yikes! It’s airborne

By BETSY MCCAUGHEY If you’re working in an office or eating in a restaurant and someone 30 feet away exhales tiny particles of coronavirus, those particles can drift across the room and infect you. Picture cigarette smoke wafting across a room. Same thing. The precautions agencies like the World Health Organization and the federal CDC are telling you to take against this virus aren’t good enough. Social distancing — placing desks and restaurant tables six…
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The guessing game

By KATHLEEN PARKER The mystery of Joe Biden’s running mate takes me back to 2008, when the political world breathlessly awaited John McCain’s surprise pick. Back then, the whispered word was that Democrat-turned-independent Joe Lieberman was McCain’s top choice. But the powers that used-to-be wanted a relatively unknown dynamo from Alaska — then-Gov. Sarah Palin. After a chat with McCain in Sedona, Arizona, where all manner of magic is said to occur, the roguish, pro-life…
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Saving what we can

By CONNIE SCHULTZ Before I sat down to write this column, I looked out our front window and found our hydrangeas in a state of despair. It’s 91 degrees — a July cold snap in Phoenix, perhaps, where it’s currently 107 degrees, but here in Cleveland, it’s the temperature of wilted morale. This was possibly not true last summer, but that was when an air-conditioned dinner out with friends was one of the most ordinary…
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Personal liberty squeezed in a vice

By JUDGE ANDREW NAPOLITANO Last week, this column addressed the expectation of revolution and the exhilaration of freedom that pervaded the 13 colonies during the summer of 1776. This summer in America, we are approaching the end of a civilized and free society as we have known it. The freedom to walk outside without worrying for your life and the reliance that constitutional freedoms are guarantees that the government will honor have dissipated. The effects…
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